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September 2017 Photospeak

Published on: 2017-09-10 14:35:22     271 times read    0  Comments

Dairy farming is a major agriculture-based business in Nepal with a history dating back many years. The business which had remained in the traditional form has been modernised with the use of new technology mostly over the last 3-4 decades. Nepali dairy farms which used to produce basic traditional dairy products such as milk, yoghurt, ghee and mohi (buttermilk) are now engaged in a whole range of activities including the production of pasteurised milk, soured milk, butter, soft cheese, hard cheese, ice cream and milk confectionaries.  With the rising population and increasing income of Nepalis, the demand of milk products has increased over the years. 

The state-owned Dairy Development Corporation (DDC) covers 40 percent of demand of milk and dairy products in the country. Meanwhile, private dairies and local producers in villages and towns fulfill the remaining 60 percent. DDC has been producing 6 million litres of milk monthly to produce pasteurised milk and various milk products.  Since, the raw milk produced within the country does not meet the demand, skimmed milk in powder form is imported from India and other countries. In FY 2016/17, Nepal imported milk products around Rs 3 billion. In the meantime, the dairy business contributes 10 percent to the national economy of Nepal.  The following photos depict the milk product making process at Bhadrakali Dairy and DDC. 

Photos: Saroj Ranjit


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